Great Gobi B

Biosphere Reserve


Area 18'000 km2
Height
aprox. 1000 Meter above sea level

South-West Mongolia

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Great Gobi B

Biosphere Reserve


Area 18'000 km2
Height
aprox. 1000 Meter above sea level

South-West Mongolia




read more

Takhi

Holy Animal of Mongolia


Population Great Gobi B SPA 278 Animals
back home since 1992

read more

Takhi

Holy Animal of Mongolia


Population Great Gobi B SPA 278 Animals
back home since 1992

read more

Takhi

Holy Animal of Mongolia


Population Great Gobi B SPA 278 Animals
back home since 1992


read more

Takhi

Holy Animal of Mongolia


Population Great Gobi B SPA 278 Animals
back home since 1992

read more

Great Gobi B

Biosphere Reserve


Area 18'000 km2
Height
aprox. 1000 Meter above sea level

South-West Mongolia



read more

Great Gobi B

Biosphere Reserve


Area 18'000 km2
Height
aprox. 1000 Meter above sea level

South-West Mongolia



read more

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Friends of the Wild Horse
c/o Stiftung Wildnispark Zürich
alte Sihltalstrasse 38
8135 SIhlwald
phone +41 44 722 55 22
info@savethewildhorse.org

Account AKB, 5001 Aarau
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History

Re-introduction of the Takhi - a Story of Success

  • 1878: Polish explorer Nikolai Michailowitsch Przewalski brought  back skin and skull of a wild horse back to St. Petersburg from a expediton which led him to central asia. Up to this moment Takhi was not known in the western world and the ancestors of the wild horse were considered extinct in the wild as was the tarpan.
  • 1899-1901: Successfull capturing by Hagenbeck and Falz Fein: 52 przewalski foals were brought to Europe alive.

  • 1947: Last capturing of a przewalski horse: Mare Orlitza III was brougt to Askania Nova (Ukraine) and played a major part in the further breeding.

  • 1940ties: The present stock of wild horses is traced back to 13  breeding animals, one of which is known to be a domestic horse.

  • 1958: Erna Mohr starts the first breeding book. All 238 takhis kept in zoos between 1899 and 1958 were listed in it. It is updated every year by the Zoo of Prague.

  • end of 1960ties: First exchange of Przewalski's Horses between Prague and Munich.

  • 1968: Last sight of a Takhi in the wild at Gun Tamga, Great Gobi B).

  • 1985: Start of the European Endangered Species Programme (EEP). At the beginning of the nineties, the wild horse population under human care counts more than 1000 animals.

  • 1985: Evaluation of possible locations for Takhi reintroduction in Mongolia by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

  • 1991: Enclosures are set up at Takhintal by Christian Oswald.

  • 1992: First transports of wild horses from Askania Nova to Takhintal and from Europe to Hustai Nuuru (near Ulanbaatar).

  • 1997: At Takhintal, the first wild horses are released to freedom from the acclimatisation enclosure.

  • Between 1992 and 2004: 89 Przewalski's Horses are brought from Europe to Takhintal (report in german).

  • 1999: Foundation of the International Takhi Group (ITG) in order to concentrate the efforts of different organisations. First president: Jean-Pierre Siegfried.

  • 2004: Last transport from Europe to Mongolia until 2012. A  total of 89 Takhis had been flown to the Great Gobi B Strictly Protected Area since 1992.

  • 2007: First transport within Mongolia: 3 stallions from Hustai Nuruu are brought to the Great Gobi B.

  • 2012: In May 4 stallions from the breeding station Jimsar in northern China are brought to the Gobi B. They are released to freedom in August 2012.

  • Since 2012: Four mares per year are brought from Prague to Takhintal selected by the European Endangered Species Programme. This helps to enlarge genetic variability.
  • 2017: Celebration of "25 years of reintroduction of the Takhi in Mongolia". The population has reached 200 Takhi by the end of 2017.

    historical facts: Jiri Volf "Das Urwildpferd" ISBN 3 89432 471 6

film about the beginnings of the Takhi-reintroduction